New Detention Pods Being Installed In Airports, Thanks To The TSA

By: Kristin Tate
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Detention pods at Syracuse International Airport

Get ready to jump through yet another “security” hoop next time you travel by plane.


The TSA is now installing exit “detention pods” at major airports that will temporarily “jail” passengers before they are allowed to leave terminals.

Here is how the pods work: when passengers are ready to leave a terminal, they will be forced into the pods, one at a time. Each passenger must remain in the pod until an electronic voice gives them permission to leave and the door opens.

After passing through a pod, passengers may not re-enter the terminal without going through security again.

Currently at most airports, TSA agents stand at terminal exits for safety purposes. The idea is that these new pods will replace such agents, therefore saving money and increasing security.

The pods are already being used in the Syracuse International Airport.

Syracuse Airport Commissioner Christina Callahan said, “We need to be vigilant and maintain high security protocol at all times. These portals were designed and approved by TSA which is important.”

At Callahan’s airport, the post cost $60 million to install.

While the pods will likely make some passengers feel secure, other travelers are likely to feel like they are being treated like prisoners.

InfoWar’s Paul Joseph Watson pointed out that there are already multiple TSA standards in place that make “travelers feel like they are under constant suspicion”:

“While threatening to arrest passengers who make jokes about airport security, the federal agency has also instituted a ludicrous ‘freeze’ policy whereby travelers are ordered to stand in place like statues while TSA agents resolve some unexplained security threat.

Another policy that has provoked questions is the TSA’s random testing of passengers’ drinks for explosives after they have already passed through security and purchased beverages inside the secure area of the airport.”

Of course, some level of security is necessary in any international airport. However, there is a balance to be struck between making passengers safe and making them feel imprisoned or violated.

 

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Kristin Tate is a multi-media reporter for Breitbart News and BenSwann.com. Dedicated to fearless journalism, she regularly works on undercover stings with James O'Keefe to reveal government waste, abuse, and fraud. Tate was a Young Americans for Liberty (YAL) Chapter President and Founder. She will continue to fight tirelessly for individual liberty and free markets through new media. Visit Kristin's website at www.TheLibertarianChick.com.
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  • Drew R

    Another wasteful, pointless, 1984-ish expenditure brought to you by the Testi Stroking Administration

  • Wayne D.

    Who knows what other technology could be used in these pods or added later?
    Maybe they’ll start spraying people with some kind of aerosal vaccine to protect us from viruses? For our own good of course, like flouride.
    I wonder if they’re bomb proof?
    I think I’ll restrict my travels to the highways and take my chances with the road check points and drug and bomb sniffing dogs.

    • tzakrajsek

      The road check points are worse I hear — better to just stay inside.

      • g.johnon

        now you are falling in line. stay in your home, do no leave, watch cnn.

    • G. Dowels

      Future versions include built-in scanners that detect the microchips that the government will soon be making us get implanted… duh.

  • LibertyAddicted

    looks like a guy just walking through a door….

    • Drew R

      not hard to see that it’s a chamber

    • g.johnon

      a door with a button and some guy to push it to lock it completely if he does not like your tattoo.

  • LibertyAddicted

    why are there no sources/references cited? :-/

  • Logic

    “The TSA is now installing exit “detention pods” at major airports that will temporarily “jail” passengers before they are allowed to leave terminals.”

    I’m glad you at least used quotes. You’re a joke.

    • eyeswideopen

      the joke would be your mindless reply

      • tzakrajsek

        I believe Logic is correct here. These man-traps are common in many secured areas and are a more robust alternative to the naive turnstile. Calling them “detention pods” is link-bait titling because you are only being “detained” for a moment while the door behind you closes and the door in front of you opens.

        What a hoot — calling a man-trap a “jail”.

        • Drew R

          Feed them milk before meat… Why the hell can’t people just walk in and out of the airport like they used to? It worked just fine the way it was.

      • Logic

        No, whats mindless is being unable to differentiate between being “jailed” (definition:to put (a person) in jail) and being locked between two doors for a moment.

        What’s truly mindless is not examining the motives behind her choice of words and the impact those words can have on the way people reading the story perceive the situation.

        • g.johnon

          you have so thoroughly misnamed yourself.

          • Logic

            please, go on.

          • g.johnon

            after going back an rereading you past two comments, I must apologize for being a little harsh.
            you actually make a good point in that there does seem to be some knee jerking going on here as the article Is indeed vague and lacking in poignant information.
            my bad and my apologies.
            where we still disagree is in your attempt to separate jailing and locking up as two different things. the only real difference here is time served.
            but again, after reading the article again, I see no real evidence given even to show that other airports are planning the same system.
            so, my distain for your logic abates.

          • Logic

            Eh, I think theres a huge difference between being jailed or even detained and being momentarily help up in an exit door.

            But to each his own since my main point was always that this article is written with the intent to make people feel a certain kind of way.

          • g.johnon

            it does seem a fine point, especially to the perception of the one being detained. a brief moment may not even be felt as an inconvenience compared to days, months or years in jail. but the precedent is the thing. the government cannot lock you up without probable cause. no matter how brief the time. a little fudge and the cat is out of the bag.

    • tzakrajsek

      I agree, this article’s title is link-bait. Equating a man-trap with jail is just a way to rile-up people that are missing this vital context. Misleading reporting on this site (as usual) leaves me wondering why I still come here.

      • Drew R

        If you’re a fan of misleading reporting then you ought to stick with corporate media news. A tad bit sensational to call these chambers ‘jails’? Maybe.. But in spirit, that’s kind of what they are and have the potential to be.

      • Slim_Strontem

        IF there was a report that these trapped a terror suspect, would you REALLY object to an article that said: “The shooter was instantly jailed by the new security feature.”
        —Is a holding cell different from a holding pen? Is there a difference between a holding pen and a jail? The frigging FACT is that these (and other procedures) are used entirely to subjugate, intimidate, and acclimate the populace.
        Moo.

      • g.johnon

        if it locks you in, even briefly, it is a jail. if there is no probable cause for the lockup, it is an illegal jail.

  • Skrilla Mcskrillerson

    Number of terrorist plots or otherwise dangerous situations that have been prevented by the TSA: 0.

    • Uncle Arty

      I hope you’re being sarcastic, if not you’re just a bald faced liar

      • Chris Parsons

        By all means, please link to a single story that states the TSA has stopped a terror plot.

        • Drew R

          the TSA are terrorists themselves! Seriously…

        • Uncle Arty

          I never said they did, and let’s go on the assumption that they have, does it outweigh the cost of our freedom? Hell No

      • LocalHero

        Boot-licker.

    • Uncle Arty

      Completely my bad, I totally misread the comment and thought it was claiming the TSA were stopping terrorists. no way in hell do I accept or tolerate any government infringement on anyone’s civil liberties.

  • Bonesteel

    Sounds like someone that is highly connected just got themselves a nice contract to build and install all these glorified revolving doors. How long until they realize that these things are creating a choke point and are removed just like the back scatter machines from a few years ago. Just more money from the taxpayers. More cronyism!

    • Drew R

      And don’t forget about doofuses like Chertoff profiting from the nude-o-scope body scanner contracts!

  • Money_Machine

    So, you create a choke-point in an airport, so you have a pile of people in one location. Then you have a terrorist who wants to cause terror. And then you have a choke point. And then you have a terrorist. Chokepoint. People. Clustered people. Terrorist. Chokepoint.

    I see where this is going, and it’s not in a good direction.

    • tzakrajsek

      While I appreciate your concern, these man-traps open up in the case of an emergency.

      • Drew R

        So much trust in the system young grasshopper, so much trust…

      • Aaron Weyhrich

        PROVE IT.
        And there is no trust in this direction, why should we trust in that direction…..

      • Tom223

        They better have 30 or 40 of them at each exit. In an emergency, such as a fire, it would still take a crowd of people for ever to get through them one by one.

        • Tom223

          That’s one person by one person per door. I’m not suggesting they would only place one door at an exit.

      • g.johnon

        an emergency like a bomb just went off and killed everyone so open the door?

  • Slim_Strontem

    Because of cowards. Fricking stand up for yourselves. If you see something, DO SOMETHING about it. Yes, it will probably ruin your trip–But if only 1% of people starting ACTING like free individuals, the TSA would be completely overwhelmed–Let alone, 5, 10, 20, or 30 percent. Stop the madness, or stop flying.

    • LocalHero

      I stopped flying completely. I will never again set foot in an airport.

  • alabubba

    I travel in a wheelchair, How are they going to stuff that in there little roundabout turnstile thingy

  • Aaron Weyhrich

    I WILL NOT GET INTO ONE OF THESE.

    • Aaron Weyhrich

      More specifically, I will seek out an exit that does not require me to walk through this “exit portal”.

      WHAT IT SHOULD BE – Is a large rotating piece of curved glass that circulates around the pod, NEVER ENTIRELY CLOSING the passenger in. DO NOT potentially “LOCK” me into ANY small enclosed structure. Period.

      • Aaron Weyhrich

        IF IN FACT THE ULTIMATE INTENTION is to create a 1-way exit, what about the classic turnstyle rotating door?
        pic ↓
        http://www.boonedam.us/img/new/products/prod-tourlock.jpg

        • Miguel Martinez

          logical and it would not cost 60 million per airport that figure is just wow! who’s getting the money?

          • Tom223

            But the airport ones could be chrome plated and also have an electronic voice thanking the passenger for their “voluntary compliance”.

          • g.johnon

            cia, nsa, and other black operators. it’s an old government accounting trick. its why toilet seats cost the gov 500 bucks a pop.

        • Not Bob

          You cant charge 60 million per airport for something that already exists everywhere !

      • g.johnon

        to lock anyone up, even for 5 seconds, without probable cause, is false arrest.
        we are not in Kansas anymore toto.

        • tzakrajsek

          It isn’t for 5 seconds, it takes less than two seconds for the door in front to open.

          • g.johnon

            ok, 2 seconds then. getting the drift now?

          • tzakrajsek

            If you are truly unwilling to compromise any amount of physical freedom in an airport, then you already are opting out from using airports due to the compulsory long queues, invasive scanners and pat downs. Do you still use the airport? Why will this be any different?

          • g.johnon

            zero tolerance for tyrannical bullshit.

      • tzakrajsek

        It must also be unable to allow more than one person at a time to enter the pod. This idea is mutually exclusive with always giving the person an exit.

        • Aaron Weyhrich

          The news segment referenced that up to 6 people can enter at once….

          • Joe Eckstein

            brings new meaning to cluster f@!%

      • g.johnon

        good luck with that hunt.

    • Joe Eckstein

      Call the Fire Marshal.

  • KevinAidenLogan

    And what happens in the event of a fire in the terminal? How is everyone expected to get out of the building in time with these death traps in place at the exits? And what’s up with this “Freeze Policy”? Who makes up this stuff?

  • LocalHero

    This is nothing but slave training.

    • MollyPitcher28

      I absolutely agree. This is government conditioning us to not question authority, behave, do what you’re told and, THEY’RE GETTING AWAY WITH THIS?!
      Prison, stun gun, disappearing of Americans….They’ve already achieved their goal short of putting putting decent patriotic Americans, Christians, Veterans into concentration camps….of course, for our own safety….

      • Concerned American

        I agree MollyPitcher28. We are being conditioned not to question any authority. That is how the government will eventually become a totalitarian regime. No one questions the police or TSA, and this is a behavior we need to change. All authority should be questioned from time to time. TSA and rouge government agencies like them should be questioned more so.

  • http://bevoluntaryist.com/ BeVoluntaryist

    “Feeling safe” doesn’t matter. If it doesn’t make you safe, from real threats, then it doesn’t belong.

  • http://www.tiffanymadison.com/ Tiffany Madison

    No sources listed. Where did that TSA quote come from? If you Google this story, you find another report:

    “They [automated glass doors] allow arriving passengers to exit the secure area of the airport and it eliminates the need for us to have someone watching the exits,” Callahan said. SOURCE: http://www.9wsyr.com/news/local/story/New-exit-portals-at-Hancock-Airport-causing/PJjV_Yr97kKe2b3JH7m6pA.cspx
    it appears as if the portals are part of the renovations at the airport, and Hancock is the first in New York State to have them. There is no evidence the airport didn’t fund these itself, right? Do we know this as a fact? Could the TSA be reached for comment?

    • denise0513

      Does any intelligent life forms work at the TSA in order to get a comment?

      • http://www.tiffanymadison.com/ Tiffany Madison

        They’ve provided me with comment within 6 hours.

        • g.johnon

          care to share it?

          • http://www.tiffanymadison.com/ Tiffany Madison

            Sorry, let me clarify. I didn’t cover this story, but I’ve written about the TSA twice, once for the Washington Times and again for Policy Mic. For my past pieces, they have responded within 6-8 hours for comment.

          • g.johnon

            thank you for clarifying. now I am wondering, what was your point?

          • http://www.tiffanymadison.com/ Tiffany Madison

            I thought my point was clear. Was the TSA contacted to confirm or deny this story? Standard journalistic practice is to contact the source, not spread disinformation. There is no mention of any contact with the TSA or Hancock Airport, the only place these “jails” have been installed. Seems like that’s an important detail, don’t you think?

          • g.johnon

            ok, gotcha now :-)

        • denise0513

          You missed my point!

  • Brian

    $60 million? Are you serious? Retro revolving doors……. bullet proof glass…… and start/stop controls….a LOT cheaper means to the same end.

  • r3VOLution IS NOT republican

    DAMMIT, REPUBLICAN Tate. ALMOST a solid piece.

    “Of course, some level of security is necessary in any international
    airport. However, there is a balance to be struck between making
    passengers safe and making them feel imprisoned or violated.”

    Actually, the republican/democrat (same thing) TSA, is UNCONSTITUTIONAL and VIOLATES Posse Comitatus AND MAKES NOBODY ANY SAFER THAN BEFORE THEIR EXISTENCE.

    You, typical of REPUBLICANS, failed to differentiate PRIVATE airport security and UNCONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT “security.” And seemed to insinuate that there can be a balance between GOVERNMENT TYRANNY AND PUBLIC SAFETY… an IMPOSSIBLE balance our founders WARNED US not to even entertain.

  • Samson

    Orthodontists in Edmonton are affordable and reliable.

  • eryka

    All because our species can’t stop killing each other for no reason. Seriously, all this shit because idiots have to go to an airport and kill innocent people just working their jobs, flying to their jobs, or to visit their family and for what?… because they’re angry at the world? government? whatever. Sad that this is what has to happen now because some people can’t handle their shit. if you wanna kill somebody or harm innocent people. just kill yourself and save us all the trouble.

    • eryka

      I agree with the majority of the comments below me.

      • g.johnon

        ah, the old “I run with the herd” defense. brilliant!

    • Not Bob

      This isn’t caused by some cosmic change in people, this is nothing but the government exerting control as they expand the police state. There is zero evidence that these will change anything, they will not improve security because thats not what they are designed for – their sole purpose is to terrorize the population.

  • http://drjdsjr.com J D Smith Jr.

    I simply don’t fly anymore.

    • g.johnon

      understandable, but very sad.

  • anarchobuddy

    Please pardon me if this is a silly question, but what purpose do these pods serve exactly? I just don’t understand how making people wait in a glass box until a voice tells them they can leave increases security.

    • Phydeux

      Its “security” through behavior modification. It reinforces TSA control over your movements and behaviors at both the entrance and exit of the travel system.

      • Logic

        No. Its a physical barrier stopping people from going into the terminal from an unsecured location. How it was before was a single TSA agent standing in a hallway alone, which has to me, always been an airports most glaring weakness.

        This solves that issue.

        • Phydeux

          That “glaring weakness” isn’t as weak as you think. Most airports supplement agents on the exit ramp with cameras.

          That’s why the signs tell you not to turn back after a certain point. The cameras detect if you’re going against the expected flow of traffic and trigger an alarm.

          So just because you don’t see a lot of security mechanisms and personnel doesn’t mean its not there.

          • Logic

            This adds physical security as well.

            I’m by no means a part of the “more airport security” camp.

            I’m just saying this isn’t behavior modification and its really not a huge deal compared to a lot of other security measures that have been implemented by the TSA.

            These exits dont even actually have anything to do with the TSA, this article is terribly misinforming. The TSA recently decided they were going to stop offering security at exits, leaving the airports themselves to figure out how to do it. So really, if anything, these new exits are a step BACK for the TSA.

  • Not Bob

    50 million for one airport, these things must be gold plated or they are built by an ex-federal directors company who has traditionally ripped off the tax payers

    • g.johnon

      probably only costs a few hundred thou to build em. the rest of the 60 mill goes to black ops.

      • Not Bob

        Not black ops, the pockets of the security contracting firms owners and employees and the politician and bureaucrats they bribed to get the deal.

        • g.johnon

          yeah, that too.

  • Phydeux

    ONE word will derail these… CLAUSTROPHOBIA.

    All you have to do is get nervous and fidgety and demand to avoid them because you panic in tightly enclosed places like closets and public toilet stalls. (Just don’t let them see you use the airport bathroom!) If you go into a breakdown at the mere suggestion of being forced into one of these things, they’ll have a media nightmare on their hands.

    And having a friend with a camera on their phone recording the whole thing doesn’t hurt either.

    • Joe Eckstein

      You were just launched into the air in an aluminum tube with a couple football teams worth of people and you’re suddenly Claustrophobic? Hmm…

      • Phydeux

        There’s a huge difference between a plane and a booth the size of a broom closet. But the plane’s lavatory, that’s about the same.

  • Jerm

    $60 million to install. You could conceivably pay someone $20/hour, which equates to just over $41,000/year to babysit that same entrance. For 24/7 coverage, that would require a minimum of five people at 40 hours/week, which would amount to about $208,000/year. At $208,000/year, it would take just over 288 years to break even on the $60 million investment in these “doors”. Yup, seems very “cost effective” to me. ha!

    • Jerm

      I forgot to include health benefits in the consideration of salary, so let’s just cut the 288 years in half and say a good 144 years (very generous benefits package!). Still nowhere near a five year return on investment!

      • d

        Our tax payers dollars at work people! Still trust these idiots? If you have any common sense, then you should be outraged at this bs.

  • g.johnon

    you pretty much know things are going to shit when you have to ask: “who is going to protect us from our protectors?”

  • Kenton Forshee

    Do they come with a knockout gas for those they want to capture? At that price it should.

  • Mick-Doscious

    Detaining people without probable cause? That is false arrest. You CANNOT block anyone from exiting any given area for ANY amount of time…this is just begging for someone to sue and get their cut of that bogus 60 million dollar claim. This, and the infringement of mine and my childrens rights not to be groped by mouth breathing slack jawed double digit IQ wanna-be gestapo is why we drive where we want to go.

    • Joe Eckstein

      Have the fire marshal shut it down.

    • Logic

      This isn’t false arrest. It’s a one way airlock-esqe exit door.

      Look dude, the TSA is bad. I get that, I agree. But this is literally just an exit. It doesnt scan you. It doesnt hold you. You walk inside for a few seconds then you leave. It simply prevents people from going back inside, which is a potential issue when terminals only have one chubby TSA agent sitting in a chair at an otherwise unprotected exit.

      I want to say it again, the TSA is bad. But the TSA doesnt evenhave much to do with this. The TSA announced recently that they will no longer provide security for exits. So now airports are looking for alternatives.

      Its an exit door, not a “detention pod”.

      Awful article as expected from someone with the agenda that Kristen has.

      • Lani M Dingman Siciliano

        And what about people with children? No way no how am I putting them in one alone. This just guarantees I won’t ever fly again.

  • A

    Is Zyklon B included ? Would be a great cost-saver. I mean, no need for a judge, just let a grumpy racist security guard decide who is suspect and dangerous.
    God have mercy of America.

  • Your1Friend

    Yet another truly moronic idea by an agency very much in need of reformation.

    While these are certainly useless and unneeded, I doubt if “Detention Pods” are even Constitutional.

  • Jk Walker

    Been through these at Syracuse. Calm down everyone. It is no different then what you have at some banks. It prevents re-entry to the airport, which currently takes 4-5 full time employees rotating 24/7, 365. I just see no way it cost 9Million to install 4 of these pods. Must be the cost of the whole syracuse AP security revamp.

  • Joshua Thompson

    Just claim ‘emotional distress’ because you are claustrophobic and sue the hell out of them. Then us the money to start a pro Rand Paul Super PAC and dump it all into the 2016 elections. Then maybe we can start to retrieve the freedom’s we’ve been losing since 9/11/01.

  • Bflag

    Stop feeding the beast..Stop flying